Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences 2021

Unlike the other Nobel prizes, the economics award wasn’t established in the will of Alfred Nobel but by the Swedish central bank in his memory in 1968, with the first winner selected a year later. It is the last prize announced each year.

Last year’s prize went to two Stanford University economists who tackled the tricky problem of making auctions run more efficiently.

It also created an endearing moment when one had to knock on the other’s door in the middle of the night to wake him up and tell him they had won.

Last week, the 2021 Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to journalists Maria Ressa of the Philippines and Dmitry Muratov of Russia for their fight for freedom of expression in countries where reporters have faced persistent attacks, harassment and even murder.

The Nobel Prize for literature was awarded to U.K.-based Tanzanian writer Abdulrazak Gurnah, who was recognized for his “uncompromising and compassionate penetration of the effects of colonialism and the fate of the refugee.”

The prize for physiology or medicine went to Americans David Julius and Ardem Patapoutian for their discoveries into how the human body perceives temperature and touch.

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Three scientists won the physics prize for work that found order in seeming disorder, helping to explain and predict complex forces of nature, including expanding our understanding of climate change.

Benjamin List and David W.C. MacMillan won the chemistry prize for finding an easier and environmentally cleaner way to build molecules that can be used to make compounds, including medicines and pesticides.

The Nobel Economics Prize on Monday wraps up a Nobel

season characterised by surprising picks, with a number of women in with a chance of scooping the traditionally male-dominated prize.

This Nobel season, only one woman has won—Philippine journalist Maria Ressa who won the Peace Prize on Friday—while the economics prize has so far only been awarded to two women in history, Elinor Ostrom in 2009 and Esther Duflo in 2019.

American Anne Krueger, formerly the number two and briefly the managing director at the International Monetary Fund (IMF), as well as a former Vice President for Economics and Research at the World Bank, is one possible winner.

At 87, she is also “getting older, which usually isn’t a handicap when it comes to winning Nobel Prizes”, Micael Dahlen, a professor in marketing at the Stockholm School of Economics, told AFP.

Her compatriot Claudia Goldin, whose research has focused on inequality and the female labour force, is another favourite to become the third woman to receive the prize.

Esther Duflo, who won the 2019 Economics Award

Monday’s Nobel Prize in Economics concludes the Nobel season, which features amazing picks, and many women have the opportunity to scoop up traditionally male-dominated awards.

Macroeconomics, health and the labor market are some of our pre-announced favorite topics, according to experts interviewed by AFP.

Last award Officially this year, Sveriges Riksbank (Sweden’s) Central BankThe Economic Science Award to commemorate Alfred Nobel will be announced at 11:45 am (Greenwich Mean Time 0945).

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This Nobel season was won only by a woman named Marialessa, a Filipino journalist who won the Peace Prize on Friday, but so far the economics awards have been given to two people, Elinor Ostrom in 2009 and Esther Duflo in 2019. Awarded only to women.

Anne Osborn of the United States was formerly second-placed, managing director of the International Monetary Fund (IMF), and former vice president of economic research at the World Bank.

“I’m old, which is usually not a handicap when it comes to winning the Nobel Prize,” Michael Dahlé, a marketing professor at the Stockholm School of Economics, told AFP at the age of 87.

Her compatriot, Claudia Gordin, conducts research focused on inequality and the female workforce and is another favorite to become the third woman to win this award.

Other potential female winners are fellow American Janet Currie, known for her work on the impact of government poverty programs on children, or Belgian labor economist Marianne Bertrand and the American microeconomics. The 2007 medal was the scholar Susan Athey and the first woman to win the famous John Bates Clark.

The Nobel Economics Prize on Monday (Oct 11) will wrap up

a Nobel season characterised by surprising picks, with a number of women in with a chance of scooping the traditionally male-dominated prize.

Macroeconomics, health and labour markets are some of the favourite topics ahead of the announcement, according to experts interviewed by Agence France-Presse.

The final prize of the year, officially the Sveriges Riksbank (Sweden’s central bank) Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel, will be announced at 11.45 am local time (5.45pm, Singapore time).

This Nobel season, only one woman has won – Philippine journalist Maria Ressa who won the Peace Prize last Friday – while the economics prize has so far only been awarded to two women in history, Elinor Ostrom in 2009 and Esther Duflo in 2019.

American Anne Krueger, formerly the No. 2 and briefly the managing director at the International Monetary Fund, as well as a former vice-president for economics and research at the World Bank, is one possible winner.

At 87, she is also “getting older, which usually isn’t a handicap when it comes to winning Nobel Prizes”, Dr Micael Dahlen, a professor in marketing at the Stockholm School of Economics, told AFP.

The Nobel Prize in Literature was awarded

to the British-based Tanzanian writer Abdul Razak Gruna, recognized for his “uncompromising and compassionate penetration of the effects of colonialism and the fate of refugees.”

The Physiology or Medicine Award was given to Americans David Julius and Ardem Patapoutian for their discovery of how the human body perceives temperature and contact.

Three scientists have won the Physics Award for their work in finding seemingly chaotic orders that helped explain and predict the complex forces of nature, including better understanding of climate change.

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Benjamin List and David WC McMillan won the Chemistry Award for finding an easier and more environmentally friendly way to build molecules that could be used to make compounds such as pharmaceuticals and pesticides.

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